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{"id":2059908186179,"title":"Butterfly fish Longnose (Forcipiger flavissimus)","handle":"butterfly-fish-longnose-forcipiger-flavissimus","description":"\u003cspan\u003eFound singly, pairs or small groups in lagoons, exposed coastal and outer reefs.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThey feed on hydroids, fish eggs, small crustaceans, sea urchins and marine worms.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eLength - 22cm\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eDepth - 1-145m\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eWidespread Indo-Pacific and Eastern Pacific\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eButterflyfishes have very fine hair like teeth that enable them to pick out small organisms inaccessible to most other fish for eating.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThey thrive mainly on a diet of coral polyps, tentacles of featherdusters and Christmas-tree worms. As these food sources all zap back into their shells, butterflyfishes need to be able to hover motionless while picking at the coral and to dart swiftly over short distances to get the worm before it retracts. They do this by using their \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cabbr class=\"tooltips\" data-toggle=\"tooltip\" data-placement=\"top\" title=\"\" data-original-title=\"The paired pectoral fins are located on each side, usually just behind the operculum, and are homologous to the forelimbs of tetrapods. In many fish, the pectoral fins aid in walking, especially in the lobe-like fins of some anglerfish and in the mudskipper\"\u003ePectoral fins\u003c\/abbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003e as oars to brake, sprint, turn and even reverse.\u003c\/span\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-17T14:30:30+08:00","created_at":"2019-03-01T11:29:56+08:00","vendor":"Aquarium Gallery","type":"Marine Fish","tags":[],"price":7990,"price_min":7990,"price_max":7990,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":18889844883523,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"sc405","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Butterfly fish Longnose (Forcipiger flavissimus)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":7990,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0491\/5593\/products\/imgGwV2of21QR.jpg?v=1551411019"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0491\/5593\/products\/imgGwV2of21QR.jpg?v=1551411019","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":1667007774851,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.5,"height":540,"width":810,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0491\/5593\/products\/imgGwV2of21QR.jpg?v=1569292790"},"aspect_ratio":1.5,"height":540,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0491\/5593\/products\/imgGwV2of21QR.jpg?v=1569292790","width":810}],"content":"\u003cspan\u003eFound singly, pairs or small groups in lagoons, exposed coastal and outer reefs.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThey feed on hydroids, fish eggs, small crustaceans, sea urchins and marine worms.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eLength - 22cm\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eDepth - 1-145m\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eWidespread Indo-Pacific and Eastern Pacific\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eButterflyfishes have very fine hair like teeth that enable them to pick out small organisms inaccessible to most other fish for eating.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThey thrive mainly on a diet of coral polyps, tentacles of featherdusters and Christmas-tree worms. As these food sources all zap back into their shells, butterflyfishes need to be able to hover motionless while picking at the coral and to dart swiftly over short distances to get the worm before it retracts. They do this by using their \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cabbr class=\"tooltips\" data-toggle=\"tooltip\" data-placement=\"top\" title=\"\" data-original-title=\"The paired pectoral fins are located on each side, usually just behind the operculum, and are homologous to the forelimbs of tetrapods. In many fish, the pectoral fins aid in walking, especially in the lobe-like fins of some anglerfish and in the mudskipper\"\u003ePectoral fins\u003c\/abbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003e as oars to brake, sprint, turn and even reverse.\u003c\/span\u003e"}

Butterfly fish Longnose (Forcipiger flavissimus)

Product Description
Found singly, pairs or small groups in lagoons, exposed coastal and outer reefs.
They feed on hydroids, fish eggs, small crustaceans, sea urchins and marine worms.
Length - 22cm
Depth - 1-145m
Widespread Indo-Pacific and Eastern Pacific

Butterflyfishes have very fine hair like teeth that enable them to pick out small organisms inaccessible to most other fish for eating.
They thrive mainly on a diet of coral polyps, tentacles of featherdusters and Christmas-tree worms. As these food sources all zap back into their shells, butterflyfishes need to be able to hover motionless while picking at the coral and to dart swiftly over short distances to get the worm before it retracts. They do this by using their Pectoral fins as oars to brake, sprint, turn and even reverse.
$79.90
Maximum quantity available reached.

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