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Golden Hawkfish

Once settled, Paracirrhites xanthus colors up to a bright banana yellow, and with its purple postocular mark (eye stripe), he stands out like a beacon even in a large, busy aquarium. Another rarely imported hawkfish (to The UK at least) is Cirrhitichthys aureus, the Japanese golden hawkfish.

Also going by the common name of yellow hawkfish, (aren’t common  names helpful?!)

 

Also going by the common name of yellow hawkfish, (aren’t common  names helpful?!) C. aureus  displays the typical pointed snout and high back seen in this genus, which includes the more commonly seen C. falco. While P. xanthus, as a species, sports a universal bright yellow colouration, individuals of C. aureus display colours varying from bright golden yellow, to brown, with some fish sporting dark blotches similar to C. aprinus, the spotted hawkfish.

Most hawkfish are thought to be hermaphrodite, and exhibit a haremic social structure. Interestingly, harems of Cirrhitichthys hawkfish have been observed to contain a congener Irelated species), for example C. falco and C. oxycephalus females turning up in C. aprinus harems.
Laboratory investigations have shown that spawnings between these species also produce viable eggs.